C.P. Snow and the Digital Divide.

C.P. Snow lamented a gulf between science and literary intellectuals. That gulf still exists (perhaps it is a little different now than in the mid-20th century), and the explosion of technological development highlights it. Video games (and other entertainment media) offer a chance to bring together the left and right sides of society’s brain.

It may be that the law feels the distance between art and science that Snow considered in the context of academia. Patents may be associated with the protection of the scientific world (though they protect technology, not science) while copyright protects artistic expression. Does a distance between science and art keep a distance between two halves of IP (Trade secrets and Patents vs. Copyrights and Trademarks)? I think it does, but I’m not convinced this is altogether terrible: there are good arguments for treating patents and copyrights differently.

Law is sometimes seen as being an institution of order, measurement, and judgment. However, law is also the tool by which we gauge and weigh other institutions in society— and it is not reasonable that the instrument of measurement can measure itself. Law is often an effort to balance art and science, logic and experience, is and ought, the many and the individual—yet, if it is fair, it cannot wholly be any of these things. Perhaps an effort to bridge Snow’s Gulf could benefit law as it could bring a more holistic context to choices about either art or science. Understanding the technology and science underpinning patents as well as understanding the cultural implications of artistic expressions help each respective discipline grow. More importantly, this cross-information becomes essential as these disciplines overlap. Legal practitioners are better able to make proper legal decisions if they understand both what YouTube is (how the technology works) and what the economic and cultural implications of posting videos with copyrighted materials on YouTube are.

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