Cheat Codes, Privacy, and Disobedience: Generation Y’s Perspective.

I saw a YouTube video of some teens who had devised a most wise and useful way to spend their time. They call it “Gallon Smashing.” The idea is simple: walk through a not-too-crowded supermarket with one or two plastic gallon jugs of some liquid (milk will do). When no one is looking, smash the gallons on the floor and immediately pretend to have tripped and caused the messy spill accidentally. It’s a way to destroy property and get away with it- in fact, you come out of it looking like the hapless, innocent victim. It has all of the hallmarks of Generation Y: dastardly and unimportant destructiveness while deceiving others into letting you take on the role of the innocent victim.

My assessment of at least part of this phenomenon is that GenY has the power-fighting spirit of recent generations without the willingness to come face to face with that power. Generation X would have walked into the store, smashed the gallon of milk without any pretense, given the finger to onlookers, and walked back out or gone peacefully with the security officer (because GenX was indifferent enough to not care about getting in trouble). The protesters that preceded GenX would have entered the store with a megaphone, announced their destruction of the gallon of milk and the political motivations behind it, burned a draft card and/or bra, and would continue to make a scene until several police used tear gas and a fire hose to subdue and detain the individual.

But Generation Y? We’re used to anonymity. We feel entitled, not to fight against things or to get to have things, but to get away with things. We don’t fight the system head on, we don’t glare indifferently at the system with our middle fingers raised, but we certainly don’t support the system more than any previous generation. When our adolescents fight authority, they do it with a smile and overtly expressed support, while sneaking decisively and quietly behind authority’s back. I think this goes hand-in-hand with a generation that grew up with the anonymity of the internet. Our generation grew up with screen names and cheat codes. Previous generations saw a need to be in only one place at a time and being only one person at a time (though you could be different hour-to-hour). This generation attempts multiple existences, multiple states of mind, simultaneously. Perhaps formative years spent embracing a Cyberspace which bends previously accepted rules of time and space leads to a sense of duplicity as commonplace and identity as detachable and replaceable. Perhaps, as children, we used too many “God Mode” cheats: we became too used to invulnerability and doing whatever we wanted. (see also: Brene Brown’s TED talk on “The Power of Vulnerability”)

Of course, for all their deceptive ploys and crafty planning, GenY still posts their exploits to YouTube and Facebook, so it’s hard to be too worried about them as a threat. There is a contradiction in the rising generation: a need to publicize the secretive. The dilemma for them is the paradoxical need to be underground megastars, widely known among only a select few. They might be more deceitful and dishonest than previous generations, but they also feel a need to overshare exploits.

“Everyone wants to pull off the crime of the century…. /And get away with it. Get away with it. We Americans are freedom loving people, and nothing says freedom like getting away with it. /We went from Billy the Kid to Richard Nixon, Enron, Exxon, O.J. Simpson… /We used to dream about heroes, but now it’s just how to beat the system.” – Guy Forsyth, “It’s Been A Long, Long Time”

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