Explaining Myself Through Mini Metro: Making Lots of Connections

I’ve always been a fan of the minimalist art style. As an art style and a category of interior design, it gets a lot of adjectives like “clean,” “crisp,” “pure,” “uncluttered,” and “bright.” I’d have to agree that Mini Metro is a game with a minimalist art style. But the aesthetic isn’t the only thing that appeals to me. The game mechanic is about connecting: making a metro system that is as efficient as possible as a city places ever-increasing demands on the network.

I love the concept of connection. I love to connect ideas and words, and I have spent most of my life studying and forming such connections. Careful, structured explanations of connection and disconnection are at the heart of the practices of both philosophy and law. Like most humans, I also cherish my close connections with others. At every level, and in every sense, connection thrills and amazes me.
Mini Metro is a game that is a design model for making connections— So it’s fitting that I use it as a model to connect the areas of law in which I am interested.

The railway network itself is the telecommunications infrastructure. The people that travel on the network are the entertainment content of the digital age: text, pictures, audio, movies, games—almost all of it subject to copyright law. The signage around train stations tells people about the places: it helps people make choices based on comparative information. I admit this is the biggest stretch in the analogy, but I’m comparing that to trademarks because of the informative function that aims to dispel confusion. And of course, there are safety concerns around all public transportation. Cybersecurity, by and large, is the safety structure for the internet: it is the area of law that tries to get everyone to navigate the system without tragic injury. And just as trains are regulated, this digital structure enjoys some oversight by the FCC (in the form of general regulatory rules) and FTC (in the form of consumer protection enforcement).

One of my favourite moments in Mini Metro is when a station appears on a line I have already built. I don’t really know if this is just the RNG-gods smiling down upon me, or if there is a definite structure and these moments are signs that I have designed optimally. In the effort to connect law and technology, sometimes a new device or idea appears that can force a re-drawing of the legal lines. Part of me wants to think that a law can be created with the future in sight, but the speed and direction of technological developments are so amazing that I don’t know if policy design can do better than hope for luck.

Mini Metro can be used to explain how my areas of interest relate to one another. It can also explain why I love these things, too. In the abstract, the game is about making it possible for people to go places. It is about how large-scale design decisions affect humble individuals. Technology and law are connected to each other—and both are connected to individual lives and to society, generally. The magic of connection is that it makes each individual node matter to the other nodes with which it connects. A single idea, or law, or device, or person—nothing is all that interesting, meaningful, or exciting until it is connected to other things in the world. Then both the connector and the connected affect and transform one another as they interact. In this way, the relationship between law and technology is like a relationship between people. Whether they are friends or enemies, they will shape each other because they are connected.

 

I never said I was super good at the game. But it's still fun.

Just trying to help the Parisians get through the day.

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