Her Data Is Part of Her Story, But Her Story is not Just Her Data.

Her Story” is a great example how piecing together bits of information can create a picture of a person or an event. It is also an example of some of the limits of that picture.

Hack Her Data, Hack Her Story

Her Story” is difficult to describe or classify as a game. It’s a little like trying to find and organize the pieces of a detective novel. The game doesn’t give the player a lot of direction; part of the game is the discovery of the game itself. The game allows the player to search a police database to find short movie clips from several police interviews with a woman. No context is given for why the woman was interviewed or why the player is searching the database. However, by finding and watching the clips, the player gains clues that allow new searches. This cycle of searching and information is the core mechanic of the game.

Hacking to Learn

Hacking can mean a lot of things, but it is broadly about investigation (sometimes, it is an investigation that is against some laws). It can be done for a wide range of reasons and can take many different forms, many of them legal– or even a legitimate business. Regardless of the specific details, hacking always involves exploring the possibilities and limits of a system in order to learn or discover something. In “Her Story,” the hacking is learning what the in-game database can find that will help the player piece together a coherent string of events and characters.

The Limits of Hacking

Even after hacking together all of “Her Story,” something about the picture is incomplete. Why is the player watching these interviews? The game gives the player this answer after piecing together enough of “Her Story,” but hacking a person’s data doesn’t necessarily answer all of the questions about that person. For most criminal hackers, the pieces of data have enough of the story: credit card numbers, bank accounts, social security numbers, addresses, birth dates, etc. Sometimes we need more than a collection of data about a person, and those are often cases where believing data too blindly can cause problems, from legal decisions in courts or policies to judgments in our interpersonal relationships. As mountains of data pile up for each of us, the temptation to describe and explain people using that data also grows. This data has a lot of appeal because it can measure and evaluate some things very effectively. This effort to make life more efficient comes brings at least two potential drawbacks: First, the data can be misleading in myriad ways, and second, the data seems so powerfully scientific and sound that questioning it (or its interpretation) can become almost taboo.

Her Story

There will always be hackers trying to steal financial information and identities. But that threat is known and recognized, so experts fight against it and consumers take protective measures. The data we give to companies and employers and government is riddled with pitfalls, and blind faith in big data will amplify those problems. In “Her Story,” twists emerge as the player pieces the plot together. After enough of the story is pieced together, the game asks the player if “you understand why [the woman] did what she did.” I’m not sure any collection of data can ever really answer that.

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