Getting an MBA from the University of Auir?

Real Time Strategy games have a lot in common with business practices. The core of both is managing limited resources and making strategic decisions to achieve select objectives. Although the execution of the strategy is the obvious part of the game, Starcraft II rests on theory-crafting, timings, build paths, and strategic decisions.

Businesses – from industrial machinery manufacturing to food and entertainment services – have to consider the strategic advantages of short-term or long-term plans, organizational structures, short- and mid-range objectives, budgetary allocations and constraints, and adequate staffing. Real time strategy* games require consideration about long-term strategies, allocation of resource-gatherers, timing an expansion or an upgrade, investing in buildings or unit production, and monitoring army size and strength. The micro-decisions that appear, on the surface, to comprise the core of the game- tactics, when and where to move armies,  grouping and splitting, and so forth- are actually secondary to the  broader, macro-decisions.

Business is also concerned with the potential decisions of competitors, as well as customers and markets.  Business tries to anticipate the decisions of other forces and position accordingly. This involves some risk taking, but that riskiness is mitigated by a strong understanding of the competitor and the market. Competitive games like Star Craft II also center on anticipation and strategic positioning, and the risk involved is mitigated by experience and game knowledge.

I noticed these similarities while reading a series of business emails as executives debated making an  upgrade to their facilities and equipment. The discussion sounded strikingly similar to the internal dialogue I hear when deciding to upgrade or expand in an RTS. There were all of the considerations about the risk and cost of an immediate investment, but the undeniable fact that the action would be indispensable in the long-term. It isn’t surprising that this similarity exists: The basic concepts of opportunity cost, risk, return on investment, and long-term planning are part of everyday life. But the similarities between executives discussing a facility upgrade and a player deciding to build another base were just too uncanny to ignore. It made me wonder to what extent strategy games can prepare a person for the business world. My assessment is that if the player engages with strategy games with a methodical, process-driven paradigm, the gap is closed substantially. The fundamental essence of business is having an organized structure and process for managing resources towards a goal. Professional gamers strive to achieve exactly the same thing.

Oh, and also:  jargon – I can’t discount the role of jargon. Both business and gaming have a lot of jargon that sounds stupid, nonsensical, and pretentious to anyone outside of the practice. Often, jargon captures meaningful, actionable concepts, but it is nevertheless a roadblock to being taken seriously by those who don’t already understand and appreciate the language.

 

*Most of this also applies to turn-based strategy, but Heroes of Might and Magic 5 is a lot less thrilling to watch than Starcraft II.

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