Bonus Content: Privacy’s Meaningful Purpose

A few years ago, I dreamed up a concept of “meaningful privacy” to better define the discussion around the broad topic of privacy. I noticed that not every piece of data is equal. Some things are kept private because there is a concern of actual harm if the information is publicized. Some other things are kept private because of societal or cultural norms and traditions. Privacy is not and end in itself- we have it for the purpose of protecting information. However, different data has different value. Therefore, the value of privacy is relative, varying according to the data in question. One effect of this concept is to treat different breaches according to the type (or value) of data in question.

There is a huge and illuminating problem with this idea of “meaningful privacy”: Just because someone didn’t steal anything from your house doesn’t mean you feel comfortable about a break-in. Although privacy is not an end in itself, it is intrinsically upsetting when our privacy is violated. The biggest fear is the potential for future violations of privacy: just because no harm occurred as a result of one violation, there is no guarantee about future violations. Furthermore, a past violation of privacy indicates a vulnerability and thus the potential for future violations. With a diminished expectation of privacy, there is diminished privacy. Privacy is of little use if it cannot be relied upon.

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