Popularizing Formats For Sitting At a Table and Having a Spirited Discussion

Mediation has a surprising amount in common with the tabletop game Dungeons and Dragons.

1) Most people know very little about either one.

2) People who have heard of it often think it’s a waste of time, and may deride those who support it.

3) Neither are promoted in mainstream culture.

4) The formats bear some similar appearance: Several people sit around a table. One person seems to be “in charge,” but really, that person is just helping the other people at the table actually make meaningful decisions by providing structure and clarity for the process.

5) Neither one has a final, decisive ending that declares a winner. Rather, the purpose for both activities is to have a mutually satisfying experience and outcome; everyone wants to walk away from the table feeling like it was a worthwhile investment of 3 hours (… or 5 hours… or 18 hours…).

6) The enemy that must be defeated is abstract in both cases. For D&D, it’s the… well, the Dungeons and Dragons that must be overcome (it’s extremely clear naming). In mediation, it’s the conflict itself that is the enemy– not the other person.

More people than ever are playing D&D- and even filling theaters to watch professionals play it. Can mediation find the same increased acceptance in our culture?

 

The Wizardry of Brand Management

D&D surged in popularity in the last few years. The owner of the game and the brand, Wizards of the Coast (WotC), has rebuilt and redesigned the rules and format several times since taking over the trademark in 1993. When launching the 5th edition of the game in 2014, WotC leveraged social media to demonstrate how the game worked. The 5th edition was easier to understand, easier to play, and easier to watch than any previous edition. These changes made it more inviting for new players and also made it much more of a spectator event, which fit with the use of streaming services like Twitch and YouTube. Enthusiasts started to publish their own gaming sessions online, effectively turning their gaming product into a TV show—sort of a strange inverse of how most children’s cartoons worked in the 80s and 90s to sell toys. Like so many video games that now comprise the esports corpus, D&D became a game that collected an avid fan base and consistent spectators to fill streams and theaters. Podcasts, streams, and live performances have introduced thousands of new players to the game, as well as rekindled the imaginations of those who have not rolled a twenty-sided die in decades.

Despite their broad similarities, mediation has not exactly kept pace with D&D’s surge in popularity. Despite the overwhelming difference in cost, time, end (arguably) effectiveness, litigation remains the gold standard for dispute resolution in matters of legal consequence in the US.

Courtroom drama television shows, (and “procedurals,” generally) have done well in the US. A regular program centered on mediation could easily do as well as any long-running legal procedural show. Wizards of the Coast brought D&D out of derision and obscurity (even dismissing alleged satanic affiliations) by making it comprehensible and accessible. They used every possible tool to present an alien an esoteric game structure in a way that was engaging and entertaining, while at the same time gently informing viewers who simply watched the process.

 

Two Obstacles To Mediation’s Popularity

There is a snag in the economics of promoting mediation:  Wizards of the Coast is financially incentivized to promote their D&D product. A lot of wealthy people and companies are not necessarily incentivized to promote mediation as a primary form of dispute resolution. Trials can be incredibly expensive, and their complexity and cost often favors the side with more money to hire more experienced attorneys. Those with advantages of any kind, in any setting, are typically unwilling to give up those advantages. If the US legal system creates any advantage for those with power or wealth, it is easy to see why power and wealth would not be used to promote an alternative method of dispute resolution.

The other primary obstacle is the lack of cohesive ownership over mediation. D&D is a gaming product owned by a single company, and so decisions surrounding its brand management are made by a single entity. Mediation is a broad structure of dispute resolution, not owned by any particular body. Indeed, it is not the kind of thing that is subject to trademark or patent protection. There are trade groups and individual specialists who would like to see mediation increase in popularity, but there is no single entity with resources and authority over mediation. It is not comparable to the relationship of a company with its product. The lack of a trademark or ownership makes branding extremely difficult. Wizards of the Coast is able to manage D&D carefully, shutting down counterfeit products and distinguishing itself in the gaming market. Mediation is not the kind of thing that is subject to trademark protection.

 

The Cultural Boost for Competitive over the Cooperative

If popularity is about brand management, mediation seems condemned to obscurity because that brand can’t be effectively managed.

But how did litigation get popular without a trademark and a livestream? Perhaps the adversarial attitudes in litigation fit naturally with a competitive culture. Litigation so often becomes about beating the other side, rather than beating the conflict itself. Mediation is most successful when each side sees the obstacle as the conflict itself, and everyone works together to defeat that problem—not to defeat each other.

Despite the epithet of “rules lawyer” to describe many D&D players, a society that played more cooperative tabletop games would probably be less litigious. Taking a few hours to learn to work with someone who has different personal objectives from your own is an unusual activity in our culture, but learning to listen and cooperate might have value in an increasingly interconnected and networked society.

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Evil Vines Choking Out Unenumerated Protections (An Afterthought on Legislating for Changing Technologies)

Legislation always faces a problem of enforcement. That problem can take many shapes: lower courts or police may refuse to enforce the law, citizens may refuse to obey the law en masse, or crafty schemers may look for loopholes and technicalities so they effectively break the law without penalty. There are multiple laws, cases, opinions, and all other legal indications that children merit special and particular protection online and in digital interactions. However, there is no law specifically forbidding inflicting digital violence on a child’s avatar in a game until the child pays non-digital money— and I’m almost surprised it took so long for someone to find that opportunity. I think Penny Arcade misunderstands the problem. The problem is that all of those legal efforts to protect children could never cover every possible way that someone might try to exploit a child in a digital setting. When someone wants to exploit people for money, they only worry about the law in three ways: not getting caught, not getting tried, and not getting convicted.

This kind of example raises concerns not just in the video game industry, but across industries affected by the new General Data Protection Regulation. It would be unfairly cynical to even hypothesize that every company is nefarious, of course. A good many companies have a genuine desire to uphold the GDPR rights of their users, and their task is to work toward official compliance with the GDPR requirements– a few will even go beyond that minimum and take further measures for privacy and security. Notwithstanding, some controllers and processors still want to exploit their users, and their task is now to figure out how to sneak over, around, or through the GDPR.

 

In Both Overcooked And The GDPR, Execution Matters More Than Ingredients

I deliberately avoided playing Overcooked for a long time because so many review joked about the fights it causes with friends. Now that I’ve played it, I barely understand why it’s such a divisive experience for so many people. The game is charming and delightfully fun. Players work together in kitchens filled with obstacles (food and tables often move during the round, forcing players to adapt) to prepare ingredients and assemble meals for a hungry restaurant– though the diners are sometimes floating on lava floes and sometimes… the diners are penguins. The game is about coordinating and communicating as you adapt to changes within the kitchen. Maybe the reason so many people throw rage fits during this game is that they are not good at coordinating an effort and communicating effectively. In any case, the game isn’t about food so much as it’s about kitchens (especially in restaurants). So the game doesn’t focus so much on the ingredients as it teaches the importance of working together in chaotic situations.

People are focusing  a lot on the ingredients of the new EU data privacy law– particularly the consumer protection rights enumerated in it. However, there is very little talk about the bulk of the law, which is aimed at the effort to coordinate the enforcement and monitoring mechanisms that will try to secure those consumer rights. The rights listed in the GDPR are great ingredients– but as Overcooked teaches, it takes both execution and ingredients to make a good meal.

Supervisory Authority: How We Get From Ingredients to Meal

I’ve read a lot of articles about the General Data Protection Regulation, and I notice two common points in almost all of them: 1) the GDPR lists data privacy rights for consumers, 2) this is a positive thing for consumers. However, after reading the entire law, I think this is a gross oversimplification. The most obvious point that should be added is overwhelming portion of the statute that is devoted to discussing “Supervisory Authorities.” The GDPR may list a lot of consumer rights, but it also specifically details how these rights are to be enforced and maintained. This law prescribes a coordinated effort between controllers, processors, supervisory authorities, and the EU Board.

As described in Article 51, 1, a supervisory authority is a public authority “responsible for monitoring the application of this Regulation, in order to protect the fundamental rights and freedoms” that the GDPR lists. Each member of the EU is required to “provide for” such an authority. I can only speculate that this would look like a small, specialized government agency or board. This supervisory authority is required to work with the various companies that hold and process data (“controllers” and “processors” in the GDPR) to ensure compliance and security. The supervisory authority is responsible for certifications, codes of conduct, answering and investigating consumer complaints, monitoring data breaches, and other components of a comprehensive data privacy program. The supervisory authority must be constantly and actively ensuring that the rights in the GDPR are made real.

If the supervisory authority can’t coordinate the effort with the controllers and processors, the rights in the GDPR are just delicious ingredients that were forgotten about and burned up on the stove.